Antibiotics given to young children raise Asthma risk

Early Antibiotics raise asthma risk in babies

A study in Canada has shown that children who avoid asthma have 4 bacteria in their gut. These are faecalibacterium, lachnospira, veillonella and rothia. Research on three month old babies that went on to develop asthma by the time they were three years of age was clear. More than 300 babies were followed during the study.

Researchers said they would accumulate in the sterile baby as it passed through the birth canal in natural birth, possibly being reinforced through breast feeding.

However, these bacteria could be lost in just one course of antibiotics. Children who had been given antibiotics before the age of 1 had a much higher risk of asthma.

The researchers concluded that the first 100 days of a baby’s life were critical and that the above three factors could lead rapidly to the ‘life-threatening’ disease.

Ref: Science Translational Medicine (Sept 30th)