Fisetin may reduce dementia/Alzheimer’s risk – and more

A chemical, (Fisetin) found in low levels in various fruits and vegetables such as strawberries, grapes, onions and cucumbers appears to stop memory loss in mice studies. Research from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies showed that a daily dose of the bioactive natural compound, which is a flavonol, prevented memory loss in mice that normally developed Alzheimer’s within a year of birth.

Fisetin is currently thought to have anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, anti-aging and even anti-cancer benefits, although more research needs to be gathered. It has similar properties to another natural compound resveratrol. Both may also be found in quality supplements.

Importantly, Fisetin (like resveratrol) is known to activate a group of hormones called ‘Sirtuins’, which are also activated in times of starvation. In the second World War, nations like the Belgians and Norwegians are recorded as being extremely healthy and living longer, because of their calorie-restricted diets. Sirtuins are therefore thought to be involved with calorie regulation, but a number of studies has linked them to changes in brain metabolism, anti-aging and anti-senility.

The compound has no effect on the myeloid plaque formation.

"We had already shown that in normal animals, fisetin can improve memory," said Pamela Maher, a senior staff scientist in Salk.  Apparently the bioactive compound has both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects on cells in the brain. "What we showed here is that it also can have an effect on animals prone to Alzheimer's."

Previously, Maher discovered that fisetin helps protect neurons in the brain from the effects of aging; and that it turns on a cellular pathway known to be involved in memory.  Maher added: “In plants, flavonoids act as sunscreens and protect leaves and fruit from insects. As foods they are implicated in the protective effect of the ‘Mediterranean Diet.'”

Researcher David Schubert added that the research had shown more benefits, “This describes for the first time a drug (from fisetin) that prevents both kidney and brain complications in a type 1 diabetes mouse model. Moreover, it demonstrates the probable molecular basis of how the therapeutic is working.”

Laboratory animals with diabetes that were suffering kidney problems experienced significant improvement in their condition when they consumed a diet rich in fisetin. A chemical found in low levels in various fruits and vegetables such as strawberries, grapes, onions and cucumbers appears to stop memory loss in mice studies. Research from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies showed that a daily dose of a bioactive natural compound called fisetin, which is a flavonol, prevented memory loss in mice that normally developed Alzheimer’s within a year of birth.

 

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